Dentist reveals the EIGHT things patients do that leave them horrified

Dentist reveals the EIGHT things patients do that leave them horrified – so how many are you guilty of?

  • MailOnline spoke to dentists about things their patients do that horrifies them
  • And some will really make your skin crawl, including the slurping retainer sound 
  • They range from licking the dentist’s fingers to leaving toenails in their mouth

Going to the dentist is a necessity that most people dread. 

But for all your dental-related horror stories, you can bet your dentist has seen worse. 

MailOnline heard from two dentists about the things their patients do that leave them horrified, and some will really make your skin crawl.

From licking the dentist’s fingers, to leaving toenails in your mouth, here are the grossest things patients do. 

MailOnline heard from two dentists about the things their patients do that leave them horrified, and some will really make your skin crawl

Mouth numbing is necessary for some procedures, like teeth removal or fillings. 

But with numbing comes a lack of control.

He said: ‘Obviously losing control of the mouth as a result means when we go to have a rinse and spit, we might miss the bowl. 

‘A lengthy cleaning process ensues for our assistants but it’s always a head in hands moment. For everyone.’  

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Juice cleanses, lemon water and switching to a non-dairy milk may be the health habits some are looking to adopt for the New Year. But experts told MailOnline that the trends could cause ‘long-term damage’ to teeth and leave health fanatics needing the dentist 

Licking the dentist’s fingers 

You read that right, another revolting thing patients do is lick the dentist’s fingers, according to Dr Jethwa.

The dentist, who is also vice president of the British Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, said: ‘The non-latex gloves we use are soft compared to traditional old fashioned ones, but they aren’t for licking.

‘It’s always comical when a patient has an inquisitive tongue and goes in for a lick of the fingers.’ 

Sharing toothbrushes with your partner

Have you ever forgotten your toothbrush and used your partner’s?   

Well, Dr Jethwa says that’s a big ‘no, no’.  

He said: ‘Our gum specialist helps people with gum disease and tries to stop them losing their teeth and save them. 

‘Obviously part of that is to discuss existing cleaning habits. 

‘A few times he has recollected patients mentioning they share a toothbrush with their partner. 

‘As much as we might love them – that’s a no, no.’ 

Dr Ben Atkins, dentist and trustee of the Oral Health Foundation, previously said that brushing can make your gum bleed, so by sharing a toothbrush you could be sharing blood.

He added: ‘Brushing sometimes causes the gums to bleed, which exposes everyone you share your toothbrush with to blood stream diseases. 

‘There are many hundreds of different bacteria and viruses in our mouths and people sharing a toothbrush could be passing these on to others. 

‘While this might be something relatively harmless, such as a common cold or cold sore, if the person you are sharing with is infected with hepatitis B or HIV these could also be passed on via the toothbrush, with severe health consequences.’

With mouth numbing, comes a lack of control, and Dr Jethwa says one of his pet hates is when patients miss the bowl while spitting out fluid (file photo)

Shaking hands after putting them in your mouth 

During the pandemic, handshaking went out the window and was replaced by an elbow touch.

This was in attempt to prevent the spread of the virus.

But, as with other parts of pre-pandemic life, the practice is creeping back, and Dr Jethwa says it’s made all the worse by patients first putting their hands in their mouth.

He said: ‘Let’s just try to do it with clean hands and not hands that have just been in our mouths.’

Slurping sound from taking out retainers

If you have ever had retainers – as many people did as a teenager – you may recognise this next one.

Dr Jethwa says the ‘slurping’ noise some patients make while taking out retainers is ‘gross’.

He said: ‘If you’ve had them you’ll know the slurping sound one naturally makes when we take them out in private.

‘That sound I think we can all agree, is pretty gross.’ 

Dr Sam Jethwa said: ‘The non-latex gloves we use are soft compared to traditional old fashioned ones, but they aren’t for licking. It’s always comical when a patient has an inquisitive tongue and goes in for a lick of the fingers!’ (file photo)

Leaving things in your mouth (like toenails)

Another toe-curling dentist pet peeve is when patients leave things in their mouth, such as toenails. 

Dentist Dr Alan Clarke, clinical director at Paste Dental in Belfast, says he has also found pencil leads, plastic wrappers, a living spider, several flies and chewing gum hidden behind a back tooth.

He said: ‘We always encourage patients to take ownership of their care for both their teeth and gum health which means regular cleaning and flossing (to help eradicate those spiders webs)’ 

Not brushing your teeth 

It may seem obvious, but another one of Dr Clarke’s pet hates is when patients never brush their teeth.

He said: ‘We are not talking about missing the night-time brush if you are heading to bed late, or struggling to stay awake after a long day at the office.

‘We are talking about 15-20 years of not brushing, or never brushing – period. Yes, it’s a surprise to us too but we find it quite often.

‘There are lots of things we can do, advise and help with, to encourage optimal dental health, but the journey begins with ownership and patients accepting the vital role they personally play in maintaining their oral health.’ 

Dr Jethwa says the ‘slurping’ noise some patients make while taking out retainers – which hgold teeth in place – is ‘gross’ (file photo)

We have all seen tutorials on how to whiten your teeth at home, but ‘DIY dentistry’ goes much further, says Dr Clarke.

He says he has seen teeth whitening using household bleach and broken crowns cemented with furniture glue, nail polish and chewing gum! 

Dr Clarke said: ‘It’s dangerous, potentially toxic and a significant risk to your health, please consult a registered professional to have safe dental treatment planning and care. 

‘We hate to see the damage you can do with minimal knowledge and desperation.’  

Dr Clarke once had a patient with gum disease who attempted to glue their tooth back in.

He said: ‘I don’t know whether to be shocked, freaked out or saddened, but I have personally found large lumps of pritt-stick in a patient’s mouth as they thought (don’t try this at home) sure why not stick my loose tooth back in – with a soft white glue.’

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